Technology in Schools Faces Questions on Value – NYTimes.com

I came across this in today’s paper and found it interesting, especially since I just finished teaching an online course this summer and tend to use technology a fair amount in my teaching.  This article talks about the fact that school districts across the country have invested heavily in technology over the last decade and how difficult it is to know whether this investment has actually made a difference in learning.  One of the reasons it’s hard to come up with good data is the fact that there are just so many variables in any educational setting.  Good to think about in an era where we’re trying to figure out how to stretch a school dollar five ways.

Technology in Schools Faces Questions on Value – NYTimes.com.

2 thoughts on “Technology in Schools Faces Questions on Value – NYTimes.com

  1. You’re right Chuck, it is questionable whether it has made it difference. However, blaming the technology and the dollars spent is the wrong path. Teachers, schools, and districts misusing the tech are to blame. No one ever blamed a textbook when a child didn’t learn. As someone who has been in K-12 education for 20 years off an on, what I continually see are people who are given shiny toys but no training. Or they are given training but do not utilize it. SMART boards become expensive overhead projectors. Laptops become digital typewriters. None of the interactive features, possibilities for connected learning, higher order thinking skills, and content creation are utilized.

    • I heartily agree, Matt. I have colleagues who use very little technology in the classroom but are extremely innovative in their teaching, and I suspect there are many who use a lot of technology with very little innovation. I think technology can be a huge lever, but levers don’t work by themselves.

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